90’s Club Drug Ketamine Treats Severe Depression in New Treatment

2018-06-03T12:20:30+00:00Human Interest, Wellness|

Ketamine, a popular 90’s club drug, may be the only reason Thomas, a father of two, is still alive today.

Ketamine was created in the 1960s and is often known for some of its side effects: hallucinations and a potential dis-associative state. It was because of these side effects that the drug became popular for recreational use in the 1990s club scene; it is because of those same effects that the drug is proving to be an effective therapy for severe depression.

Considered to be one of the greatest finds in the world of psychiatry, ketamine is often used for individuals who need rapid assistance (those on the edge of suicide or those with a form of depression that does not respond to other therapies). For one father, the drug treatment has become a life-saver.

Thomas, a divorced father of two, lost both of his sons to suicide. He had battled back from severe depression with the help of therapists after his youngest son’s death, but after the suicide of his oldest son, the overwhelming grief was too much to bear.

Every six weeks, Thomas now receives a doctor-administered infusion of ketamine and, combined with other therapies, the drug is saving his life. Despite continued grief and depression (because the treatment is not a cure) he no longer wants to die. After all that Thomas has survived, he is grateful for the drug therapy and believes it has saved his life.

Listen to Thomas tell his story in the BuzzFeed video below:

Suicide Prevention Hotline and Crisis Text Line Information:

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicidal thoughts, do not turn to recreational use of drugs, instead reach out for help from a trusted friend, family member, therapist or medical professional. If you don’t feel you have any other outlet, pick up the phone and call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). You can also text the word “HOME” to 741741 to message with a trained crisis professional.