The rise of pop-punk music introduced the world to talented artists who embraced multiple music genres and created a sound all their own.

There was nothing like a Green Day concert in the 1990s. Billie Joe Armstrong could strike a chord and the crowd would go crazy for hours of in-your-face pop-punk music. It was unexpected; punk bands had an established scene: the dirty, gritty basement venues of New York City or London. Not Madison Square Garden or Wembley Stadium. So how did Green Day get so big and become such a popular, mainstream band? On the backs of all those who came before them.

Music History: The Rise of Pop-Punk Music in the 1970s and 80s

Music History: The Rise of Pop-Punk Music in the 1970s and 80s

Punk grew up in the 1970s and 1980s and eventually birthed the pop-punk genre. Thanks to bands like the Ramones and the Buzzcocks this genre spread quickly. The music was still rooted in punk with the in-your-face sped-up sound but the pop influence made the music more palatable to a larger, mainstream audience. By the 1980s, the pop charts were filled with pop-punk influenced artists like Billy Idol and The Clash.

Music History: The Rise of Pop-Punk Music in the 1970s and 80s

Other popular bands were considered to value punk influences like The Police and Blondie, but it was Green Day, in the early 1990s, that officially solidified pop-punk as a viable, mainstream music genre. Watch the video below to get a more detailed look at the rise of pop-punk music: